Eleanor Neff Powell

Booth Fowler Associate Professor: American Politics | Political Methodology

eleanor.powell@wisc.edu

(608) 265-5798

216 North Hall

Education:

Ph.D. in Political Science, Harvard University, 2009

M.A. in Political Science, Harvard University, 2008

A.B. in Politics, Princeton University 2004

Research Interests:

American Politics, Congress, Political Parties, Campaign Finance, Political Methodology, Comparative Legislatures, Political Institutions

Biography:

Eleanor Neff Powell is the Booth Fowler Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.  She received her Ph.D. from Harvard University, and previously served as an Assistant Professor of Political Science at Yale University before joining the UW-Madison faculty.  Her book, Where Money Matters in Congress (Cambridge University Press), examines the influence of money on the internal politics of Congress and the biases it has for the policy-making process.  Primarily a Congress scholar, her research revolves around three themes: the influence of money in American politics, understanding political parties, and exploring the complexities of congressional representation.  Her research has appeared in the Journal of Politics, the British Journal of Political Science, and Political Science Research and Methods among other journals.

Courses:

PS 989 American Politics Workshop Fall 2019-2020

PS 817 Empirical Methods of Political Inquiry Fall 2019-2020

PS 989 American Politics Workshop Spring 2018-2019

PS 826 The Legislative Process Spring 2018-2019

PS 373 Introduction to Survey Research Spring 2018-2019

PS 989 American Politics Workshop Fall 2018-2019

PS 373 Introduction to Survey Research Spring 2017-2018

PS 904 New Approaches to American Politics Fall 2017-2018

PS 311 United States Congress Fall 2017-2018

PS 544 Introduction to Survey Research Spring 2015-2016

PS 426 The U.S. Congress Spring 2016-2017

PS 826 The Legislative Process: Classic Questions and New Approaches Fall 2016-2017

PS 544 Introdution to Survey Research Spring 2015-2016

Awards:

2016-2017

Best Paper Award from the American Political Science Associations’ Class and Inequality Section

2015-2016

Co-winner of the inaugural Best Paper award for the APSA Class and Inequality Section for her paper “The Legislative Consequences of Fundraising Influence.”