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UW Course Guide

One way to identify classes of interest is by looking at past syllabi. Syllabi from previous semesters are available in our Syllabus Library. 

Fall 2024 Courses

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PS 104 - Introduction to American Politics and Government

Instructor: (TR 1:00-2:15pm)

Syllabus: PS 104

4 Credits

Basic institutions and processes of American government. The role of constitutional structures, parties, interest groups and elections in the system; policy formation and policy content. Enroll Info: None

Requisites
Not open to students who have taken POLI SCI 184 or POLI SCI 404
Subfield Distribution American Government
Course Designation Breadth- Social Science

Level- Elementary

L&S Credit- Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S

Repeatable for Credit No

PS 120 - Introduction to Comparative Politics

Instructor: Nils Ringe (TR 4:00-5:15pm)

Syllabus: PS 120

4 Credits

Introduction to Comparative Politics, one of the four sub-fields in Political Science, which involves the comparative analysis of political institutions, processes, and outcomes at the national level. Examines how to usefully compare politics in a variety of countries and makes comparisons explicit and systematic in order to determine how governments work, how power is organized and contested at the national level, and how regular people can participate and pursue their interests in different political settings. Includes key concepts, theories, methods, issues, and language.

Requisites
Not open to students with credit for POLI SCI 182 (or POLI SCI 186 prior to Fall 2017)
Subfield Distribution Comparative Politics
Course Designation Breadth- Social Science

Level- Elementary

L&S Credit- Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S

Repeatable for Credit No

PS 140 - Introduction to International Relations

Instructor: Mark Copelovitch (MW 2:30-3:45pm)

Syllabus: PS 140

4 Credits

Covers the major issues in international relations since the end of World War II including: the causes of war; civil wars and ethnic conflict; economic development; international trade; exchange rates and international monetary relations; international capital flows and financial crises; foreign direct investment; globalization and the environment; the UN, the IMF, World Bank, WTO, and other international organizations; and international law and human rights. The focus is on states’ relations with each other and the factors determining the nature and outcomes of these international interactions. The course seeks to develop analytical tools for thinking about important questions in world politics regardless of the countries or issues involved, to examine international affairs in a systematic way. Students who have taken POLI SCI 103 prior to Fall 2017 may not enroll in this course.
Requisites
None
Subfield Distribution International Relations
Course Designation Breadth- Social Science

Level- Elementary

L&S Credit- Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S

Repeatable for Credit No

PS 160 - Introduction to Political Theory

Instructor: Daniel Kapust (TR 9:30-10:45am)

Syllabus: PS 160

4 Credits

Exploration of core problems of political life, such as the nature and limits of obligation, the concept of justice and its political implications, and the relationship between equality and liberty, through a selection of ancient and modern sources.
Requisites None
Subfield Distribution Political Theory
Course Designation Breadth- Humanities

Level- Elementary

L&S Credit- Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S

Repeatable for Credit No

PS 182 - Introduction to Comparative Politics (Honors)

Instructor: Yoshiko Herrera (TR 2:30-3:45pm)

Syllabus: PS 182

3 Credits

Introduction to Comparative Politics, one of the four sub-fields in Political Science, which involves the comparative analysis of political institutions, processes, and outcomes at the national level. Examines how to usefully compare politics in a variety of countries and makes comparisons explicit and systematic in order to determine how governments work, how power is organized and contested at the national level, and how people can participate and pursue their interests in different political settings. Includes key concepts, theories, methods, and country case studies.

Requisites
Declared in an Honors program. Not open to students with credit for POLI SCI 120.
Subfield Distribution Comparative Politics
Course Designation

Breadth – Social Science
Level – Elementary
L&S Credit – Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S
Honors – Honors Only Courses (H)

Repeatable for Credit No

PS 206 - Introduction to Political Psychology

Instructor: Amy Gangl (TR 11:00am-12:15pm)

Syllabus: PS 206

3 Credits

Examines the psychological aspects of the political behavior of individuals–whether elites, activists or members of general publics–and their consequent political behaviors in various groups and institutional contexts. Not open to students with credit for POLI SCI 267 prior to fall 2017.

Requisites
None
Subfield Distribution American Government
Course Designation

Breadth – Social Science
Level – Elementary
L&S Credit – Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S

Repeatable for Credit No

PS 217 - Law, Politics and Society

Instructor: Rebecca Anderson (TR 2:30-3:45pm)

Syllabus: PS 217

3 Credits

Introduction to the legal process. Examination of the various concepts of law, the perennial problems of the law, legal reasoning, and the nature and function of law and the courts.
Requisites
Freshman or sophomore standing only
Subfield Distribution American Government
Course Designation Breadth- Social Sciences

Level- Intermediate

L&S Credit- Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S

Repeatable for Credit No

PS 231 - Politics in Multi-Cultural Societies

Instructor: Benjamin Marquez (MWF (9:55-10:45am)

Syllabus: PS 231

4 Credits

Race, ethnicity, and religion as political factors; cultural pluralism, politics, and policy in the United States and selected other multi-cultural politics.
Requisites
Freshman or sophomore standing only
Subfield Distribution American Government
Course Designation Breadth- Social Sciences

Level- Intermediate

L&S Credit- Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S

Repeatable for Credit No

PS 255 - Introduction to East Asian Civilizations

Instructor: Anatoly Detwyler (TR 9:55-10:45am)

Syllabus: PS 255

3 Credits

Multidisciplinary and historical perspectives on the East Asian civilizations of China, Japan, Korea, Tibet and Mongolia from prehistory to the present, including developments in philosophy, economy, governance, social structure, kinship, geography, etc.

Requisites
None
Subfield Distribution Comparative Politics
Course Designation Breadth- Humanities or Social Science

Level- Elementary

L&S Credit- Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S

Repeatable for Credit No

PS 270 - Understanding Political Numbers

Instructor: (MW 9:55-10:45am)

Syllabus: PS 270

3 Credits

How numbers and statistics are used in electoral strategies, political debates and legal proceedings. Presents basic tools of analysis and how to use them. Not open to students with credit for POLI SCI 218 prior to fall 2017

Requisites

Requisites
Subfield Distribution
Course Designation Breadth- Social Sciences

Level- Elementary

L&S Credit- Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S

Repeatable for Credit No

PS 272 - Introduction to Public Policy

Instructor: Joel Clark (TR 1:00-2:15pm OR 4:00-5:15pm)

Syllabus: PS 272

3 Credits

Major issues of public policy in such fields as economic management, welfare, education, health, energy and the environment. How public problems develop, approaches to policy-making, why programs succeed and fail. Not open to students with credit for POLI SCI 219 prior to fall 2017.
Requisites
Sophomore standing
Subfield Distribution American Government
Course Designation Breadth- Social Sciences

Level- Elementary

L&S Credit- Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S

Repeatable for Credit No

PS 277 - Africa: An Introductory Survey

Instructor: James Sweet (TR 9:30-10:45am)

Syllabus: PS 277

4 Credits

African society and culture, polity and economy in multidisciplinary perspectives from prehistory and ancient kingdoms through the colonial period to contemporary developments, including modern nationalism, economic development and changing social structure.
Requisites
None
Subfield Distribution Comparative Politics
Course Designation Breadth- Social Sciences or Humanities

Level- Intermediate

L&S Credit- Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S

Repeatable for Credit No

PS 304 - The Political Economy of Race in the United States

Instructor: (MW 9:55am-10:45am)

Syllabus: PS 304

3 Credits

Race in relation to American economic development. Problems of racial minorities in the American political and economic system. Not open to students with credit for POLI SCI 462 prior to fall 2017

Requisites
POLI SCI 104, POLI SCI 184, POLI SCI/LEGAL ST 217, CHICLA 201, or AFROAMER 151
Subfield Distribution American Government
Course Designation Breadth – Social Science
Level – Intermediate
L&S Credit – Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S
Repeatable for Credit No

PS 305 - Elections and Voting Behavior

Instructor: Barry Burden (MW 4:00-5:15pm)

Syllabus: PS 305

4 Credits

Psychological and social components of voting behavior, current electoral trends, role of voters in the governing process. Not open to students with credit for POLI SCI 467 prior to fall 2017

Requisites Sophomore Standing
Subfield Distribution American Government
Course Designation Breadth – Social Science
Level – Intermediate
L&S Credit – Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S
Repeatable for Credit No

PS 315 - Legislative Internship

Instructor: Amy Gangl (online)

Syllabus: PS 315

3 Credits

Practical experience in a legislative office. Policy research. Readings in legislative process.
Requisites
Consent of instructor
Subfield Distribution American Government
Course Designation Breadth- Social Sciences

Level- Intermediate

L&S Credit- Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S

Repeatable for Credit No

PS 316 - Careers in Political Science

Instructor: Amy Gangl (W 1:20-3:15pm)

Syllabus: PS 316

1 Credits

Facilitates transitions from undergraduate academic learning related to Political Science to meaningful and rewarding professional opportunities including jobs, paid internships, graduate study, and post-graduate fellowships. Building on core coursework in Political Science and related disciplines, addresses how to utilize existing academic learning and completed readings and assignments, extra-curricular activities, student research, for-pay work, internships, and interaction with alumni and other personal networks to further develop career options. Also provides practical ways to explore and pursue a wide range of career pathways related to Political Science. Develop essential professional development materials and self-promotional skills.
Requisites
Sophomore standing
Subfield Distribution
Course Designation Breadth-

Level- Intermediate

L&S Credit- Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S

Repeatable for Credit No

PS 320 - Governments and Politics of the Middle East and North Africa

Instructor: Marwa Shalaby (R 3:30-5:25pm)

Syllabus: PS 320

4 Credits

An introduction to the most pertinent themes to the study of politics and governance in the Middle East. Main topics to be covered: political economy of the region; link between Islam, culture and democracy; the politics of authoritarianism; and political Islam.
Requisites
Sophomore standing, POLI SCI 104 or 140
Subfield Distribution Comparative Politics
Course Designation Breadth- Social Sciences

Level- Intermediate

L&S Credit- Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S

Repeatable for Credit No

PS 324 - Chinese Politics

Instructor: Reed Lei (TR 4:00-5:15pm)

Syllabus: PS 324

4 Credits

Examine three questions about Chinese politics through a comparative perspective. First, what functions do formal institutions such as the political party, legislature, courts, and bureaucracy serve in an authoritarian regime? Second, what are the political forces that lay a good foundation for China to successfully transition from a planning economy to a robust market economy and sustain high-speed growth for more than four decades? Finally, how does the Chinese government deal with pressing social problems and threats to its authoritarian leadership in this new era?
Requisites
Sophomore standing
Subfield Distribution Comparative Politics
Course Designation Breadth- Social Sciences

Level- Intermediate

L&S Credit- Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S

Repeatable for Credit No

PS 332 - German Politics

Instructor: Nils Ringe (TR 2:30-3:45pm)

Syllabus: PS 332

3 Credits

A broad overview of politics in Germany, Europe’s politically and economically most powerful country. Several broad themes are covered: political institutions, electoral system and elections, parties and party system, interest representation, political participation, political economy, the legacies of Germany’s past, social policy, European and foreign policy, and current and future challenges. Learn to relate the German experience to broader issues, problems, and concepts used in the comparative study of domestic politics.
Requisites
Sophomore standing
Subfield Distribution Comparative Politics
Course Designation Breadth- Social Sciences or Humanities

Level- Intermediate

L&S Credit- Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S

Repeatable for Credit No

PS 334 - Russian Politics

Instructor: Kathryn Hendley (TR 8:00-9:15am)

Syllabus: PS 334

3 Credits

Theory and practice of Russian States, emphasis on politics, economic and institutional developments since 1991. Not open to students with credit for POLI SCI 633 prior to fall 2017
Requisites
Sophomore standing
Subfield Distribution Comparative Politics
Course Designation Breadth- Social Sciences or Humanities

Level- Intermediate

L&S Credit- Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S

Repeatable for Credit No

PS 338 - The Civil-Military Paradox in US Politics and Society

Instructor: Scott Mobley (TR 1:00-2:15pm)

Syllabus: PS 338

3 Credits

Protecting a democratic nation from foreign threats often requires that nation to create a powerful military. Yet the creation of a powerful military may undermine the democracy that it is designed to protect. How do, and how should, democracies manage the paradoxical relationship between civilian authority and military institutions. Explores civilian and military perspectives in U.S. civil-military relations; address issues such as the use of military advice by civilian leaders, military challenges to civil authority, and tensions generated by shared responsibility for national security between the executive, legislative, and judicial branches. Studies how civil-military relations impact wider American society by examining the garrison state hypothesis; debates centered upon the draft versus an all-volunteer force; issues of equity and inclusion; and current concerns regarding a civil-military “gap.”
Requisites
Sophomore standing
Subfield Distribution Comparative Politics
Course Designation Breadth- Social Sciences or Humanities

Level- Intermediate

L&S Credit- Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S

Repeatable for Credit No

PS 345 - Conflict Resolution

Instructor: Andrew Kydd (MW 9:55-10:45am-)

Syllabus: PS 345

3 Credits

Every war comes to an end, but some end sooner than others. This course analyzes why and how conflicts come to an end, discussion relevant theories of conflict and conflict resolution, and important cases. Not open to students with credit for POLI SCI 378 prior to fall 2017
Requisites
Sophomore standing and (POLI SCI 140 or INTL ST 101) or (POLI SCI 103 taken prior to fall 2017) or graduate standing
Subfield Distribution International Relations
Course Designation Breadth – Social Science
Level – Intermediate
L&S Credit – Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S
Grad 50% – Counts toward 50% graduate coursework requirement
Repeatable for Credit No

PS 347 - Terrorism

Instructor: Andrew Kydd (MW11:00-11:50am)

Syllabus: PS 347

3 Credits

Examines the causes of terrorism, goals and strategies pursued by terrorist groups, the consequences of terrorism, and counterterrorism policies adopted by governments. Not open to students with credit for POLI SCI 319 prior to fall 2017

Requisites
Sophomore standing and (POLI SCI 104, 120, 140, 182, 184, INTL ST 101 or POLI SCI/LEGAL ST 217) or (POLI SCI 103, 106, or 186 taken prior to fall 2017) or graduate standing
Subfield Distribution International Relations
Course Designation Breadth – Social Science
Level – Intermediate
L&S Credit – Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S
Grad 50% – Counts toward 50% graduate coursework requirement
Repeatable for Credit No

PS 349 - Global Access to Justice

Instructor: Kathryn Hendley (TR 1:00-2:15pm)

Syllabus: PS 349

3 Credits

Requisites
Sophomore standing
Subfield Distribution
Course Designation Breadth – Social Science
Level – Intermediate
L&S Credit – Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S
Grad 50% – Counts toward 50% graduate coursework requirement
Repeatable for Credit No

PS 354 International Institutions and World Order

Instructor: Lisa Martin (TR 9:55-10:45am)

Syllabus: PS 354

3 Credits

The study of international cooperation and the analysis of regional, functional, and universal regimes and institutions. Not open to students with credit for POLI SCI 337 prior to fall 2017

Requisites
Sophomore standing and (POLI SCI 140 or INTL ST 101) or (POLI SCI 103 taken prior to fall 2017) or graduate standing
Subfield Distribution International Relations
Course Designation Breadth – Social Science
Level – Intermediate
L&S Credit – Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S
Grad 50% – Counts toward 50% graduate coursework requirement
Repeatable for Credit No

PS 358 States in the World: Comparative Foreign Policy

Instructor: Jessica Weeks (TR 4:00-5:15pm)

Syllabus: PS 358

3 Credits

How do states make foreign policy decisions? What kinds of factors most influence states’ international behavior on security, economic, and humanitarian questions? What explains the foreign policies of different states? Develop skills in analyzing foreign policy from a social scientific standpoint. Examine the logic of theories and evaluate the evidence for and against different explanations for how states behave internationally. Develop knowledge of specific countries and foreign policy topics.

Requisites
Sophomore standing
Subfield Distribution
Course Designation Breadth – Social Science
Level – Intermediate
L&S Credit – Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S
Grad 50% – Counts toward 50% graduate coursework requirement
Repeatable for Credit No

PS 360 - History of American Political Thought

Instructor: Michelle Schwarze (TR 2:30-3:45pm)

Syllabus: PS 360

3 Credits

The intellectual origins and evolution of American political thought as seen through the lens of leading politicians, novelists and social critics from the Puritans to the Civil War; consideration of the central tensions of American political thought from a contemporary perspective. Not open to students with credit for POLI SCI 565 prior to fall 2017

Requisites
Sophomore standing and (POLI SCI 160 or ILS 205) or (POLI SCI 209 taken prior to fall 2017) or graduate standing
Subfield Distribution Political Theory
Course Designation Breadth – Social Science
Level – Intermediate
L&S Credit – Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S
Grad 50% – Counts toward 50% graduate coursework requirement
Repeatable for Credit No

PS 363 - Literature and Politics

Instructor: (TR 11:00-12:15pm)

Syllabus: PS 363

3 Credits

Interactions between literature and politics, and the role of literature more generally in the functioning of the political systems. Not open to students with credit for POLI SCI 570 prior to fall 2017

Requisites
Sophomore standing
Subfield Distribution Political Theory
Course Designation Breadth – Social Science
Level – Intermediate
L&S Credit – Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S
Repeatable for Credit No

PS 365 - Machiavelli and His World

Instructor: Kristi Phillips-Court (TR 11:00-11:50am)

Syllabus: PS 365

3 Credits

Introduces students to the major works of Machiavelli through the close reading of his writings in cultural and historical contexts. Discussion and targeted writing assignments will aim at cultivating in students 1) a broad understanding of Machiavelli’s principal intellectual attitudes, 2) a deeper understanding of his literary sensibility, and 3) the ability to articulate controversies and complexities surrounding his thought.
Requisites
Satisfied Communications A requirement
Subfield Distribution Political Theory
Course Designation Breadth- Literature

Level- Intermediate

L&S Credit- Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S

Repeatable for Credit No

PS 373 — Introduction to Survey Research

Instructor: Ethan Vanderwilde (TR 9:30-10:45am)

Syllabus: PS 373

3 Credits

Theory and practice of survey research; planning, sampling, questionnaire construction, interviewing, content analysis, machine tabulation, analysis of data; two hours lecture; two hours lab or field work. Not open to students with credit for POLI SCI 544 prior to fall 2017.

Requisites
Sophomore standing
Subfield Distribution American Government
Course Designation Breadth – Social Science
Level – Intermediate
L&S Credit – Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S
Grad 50% – Counts toward 50% graduate coursework requirement
Repeatable for Credit No

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PS 400 - Topics in Political Science (Continental Political Theory)

Instructors: Joshua Dienstag (TR 12:05-12:55pm)

Syllabus: PS 400

4 Credits

“Continental Political Thought” is a term used to name a particular tradition of European political theory that starts in the 18th century and includes figures such as Rousseau, Hegel, Nietzsche, Foucault and Arendt. What it means for humans to be free and unfree — and what the requirements of a free society are — these are the questions that motivate Continental political thought. To answer them we need a very fundamental accounting of what human beings are like, how they live together and how they could live together – not just an analysis of civil rights or the structure of government. Freedom is hard to understand because human beings are hard to fathom; so what it means for humans to live freely and well can only be discovered by careful analysis of society, culture and the nature of reason and language. The themes we will explore thus include: the relationship between politics, reason and culture; the roles of language and technology in society; and the competing models of political freedom that result.
Requisites
Sophomore standing
Subfield Distribution
Course Designation Breadth-

Level- Elementary

L&S Credit- Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S

Repeatable for Credit Yes

PS 400 - Topics in Political Science (Washington Ethics: History, Theory, and Practice)

Instructors: Joel Clark(TR 11:00-12:15pm)

Syllabus: PS 400

4 Credits

Are there ‘ethics’ in Washington today? The answer is ‘yes,’ although we may not support some or all of them in practice or principle. This course examines foundational, practical, and evolving conceptions of political ethics in the U.S. national context since the late 18th century to the present. A mixture of political theory and American politics, the course utilizes primary sources (e.g., laws, rulings, reports) and secondary works (e.g., scholarly research, journalistic and other popular sources) to examine perennial ethical principles and choices facing actual political actors, past and present. Case studies and class exercises will enhance our learning about ongoing, pressing choices and debates over ethical political standards and practices.
Requisites
Sophomore standing
Subfield Distribution
Course Designation Breadth-

Level- Elementary

L&S Credit- Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S

Repeatable for Credit Yes

PS 401 - Selected Topics in Political Science (Crime and Politics)

Instructor: (MWF 11:00-11:50am)

Syllabus: PS 401

3 Credits

 How should governments respond to the problem of crime? This course explores how political actors make sense of criminal behavior by crafting laws and institutions that strive to guarantee public safety. Students will examine how political institutions and the policy stream process complicate traditional understandings of crime as a purely economic, social, or moral based phenomena. Discussions and writing assignments will focus on 1) why national governments treat public safety as a public good, 2) why political actors target certain behaviors as criminal offenses, 3) why political efforts to reduce crime often reflect social inequalities within society, and 4) how elite failures to understand these inequalities often result in political backlash. This course adopts a holistic approach towards understanding the criminal legal system from a political perspective. Students will consider and challenge all viewpoints on how the current system operates and how individuals can use political systems to achieve an equitable system.
Requisites
Sophomore standing
Subfield Distribution
Course Designation Breadth- Social Sciences

Level- Elementary

L&S Credit- Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S

Repeatable for Credit Yes

PS 401 - Selected Topics in Political Science (Transitional Justice in World Politics)

Instructor: (TR 4:00-5:15pm)

Syllabus: PS 401

3 Credits

 This course is an introduction to the study of transitional justice (TJ), or how institutions – local, domestic, and international – address the legacies of human rights abuses. In this course, students will be invited to explore several key questions motivating the study of transitional justice. Why do societies pursue accountability for past repression in general? How do transitioning societies go about these pursuits? What effects might TJ policies have on prospects for democracy, rule of law, and future human rights abuses? Throughout the course, special attention will be paid to how local and global politics interact to influence both the development and the effects of different transitional justice policies. As part of the course, students will also be exposed to the variety of research methods used to study TJ, including both qualitative and quantitative approaches at the sub- and cross-national levels of analysis.
Requisites
Sophomore standing
Subfield Distribution
Course Designation Breadth- Social Sciences

Level- Elementary

L&S Credit- Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S

Repeatable for Credit Yes

 

PS 401 - Selected Topics in Political Science (Political Behavior and the Economy)

Instructor: Katherine Cramer (W 1:20-3:15pm)

Syllabus: PS 401

3 Credits

Why do people vote against their interests? If that question fascinates you, or if you have ever wondered about why people think about politics the way they do, check out this class. In this seminar, we will explore together the connection between the economy and political attitudes. We will focus primarily on public opinion in the United States, but will regularly bring in research on opinion in other advanced industrialized democracies to our reading and discussions. We will study topics such as perceptions of inequality and their effect on political attitudes, and the economic underpinnings of place-based resentment and its connection to the rise of populism, which will help us all make sense of this political moment in history. Our seminar sessions will involve small-group and whole-class discussions, a field trip or two, and your assignments will include keeping a journal and two 8-to-10-page papers related to the course content.
Requisites
Sophomore standing
Subfield Distribution
Course Designation Breadth- Social Sciences

Level- Elementary

L&S Credit- Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S

Repeatable for Credit Yes

 

PS 401 - Selected Topics in Political Science (Controversies and Challenges in British Politics)

Instructor: (TR 9:30-10:45am)

Syllabus: PS 401

3 Credits

 Why did Britain leave the EU and why did Scotland choose to remain in the United Kingdom? How has Brexit affected the prospects for a United Ireland? What is parliamentary sovereignty and should Britain reform the House of Lords to make it an elected rather than appointed body? Should Britain reconsider its hereditary monarch in favor of a republican form of government? And what of the Palace of Westminster itself—the home of Parliament—should members of Parliament decamp for several years while it undergoes massive renovation to repair a crumbing building or should business continue as usual while repairs are undertaken at the risk of dramatically increasing the bill for the taxpayer? This class will focus on the controversies and challenges facing modern Britain as it adjusts to its new role outside the EU while increasingly struggling to meet the challenges of rising sub-state nationalism at home. Students will learn about one of the world’s oldest, and most fascinating, representative democracies and the challenges its faces as it adapts to the 21st century.
Requisites
Sophomore standing
Subfield Distribution
Course Designation Breadth- Social Sciences

Level- Elementary

L&S Credit- Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S

Repeatable for Credit Yes

 

PS 401 - Selected Topics in Political Science (Wisconsin Politics)

Instructor: (R 3:30-5:25pm)

Syllabus: PS 401

3 Credits

 The goal of this seminar is to provide an overview of Wisconsin State government, with particular focus on current policy issues facing the Executive Branch/stage agencies and the Legislature. Students will also learn about how state government functions related to the state budget process and elections, and the role of the Wisconsin Supreme Court. The seminar will begin with a discussion about the early history of Wisconsin state government as well as its relationship with Wisconsin’s twelve First Nations. The class will involve guest lectures with leaders in the public sector and require students to be prepared to engage in discussion each class.
Requisites
Sophomore standing
Subfield Distribution
Course Designation Breadth- Social Sciences

Level- Elementary

L&S Credit- Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S

Repeatable for Credit Yes

 

PS 401 - Selected Topics in Political Science (Why We Fight: The Politics of Intergroup Conflict)

Instructor: (T 1:20-3:15pm)

Syllabus: PS 401

3 Credits

Why do we participate in intergroup conflict? How does conflict affect our attitudes and behaviors towards others? Can we reconcile and rebuild after intergroup conflict? Intergroup conflict has been a pervasive feature of human history and continues to shape the lives of millions of people around the world today. In this course, we will look at why we participate in intergroup conflict, the political, psychological, and social consequences of intergroup conflict, and how we might rebuild and reconcile in the aftermath of intergroup conflict—if at all. We will consider a broad range of cases representing every major region of the world and various forms of intergroup conflict—from social polarization in the United States of America to ethnic violence in Bosnia-Herzegovina. Additionally, this course is designed not only to deepen our understanding of the causes and consequences of intergroup conflict but also to facilitate individual and collective reflection on how we engage in and are affected by intergroup conflict in our daily lives, and how we might strive to resolve it constructively.
Requisites
Sophomore standing
Subfield Distribution
Course Designation Breadth- Social Sciences

Level- Elementary

L&S Credit- Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S

Repeatable for Credit Yes

 

PS 405 - State Government and Public Policy

Instructor: Luke Fuzsard (MF 8:00-9:15am)

Syllabus: PS 405

3 Credits

The structure of state government and the politics of public policy-making in the fifty states.
Requisites
Sophomore standing 
Subfield Distribution American Government
Course Designation Breadth- Social Sciences

Level- Elementary

L&S Credit- Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S

Repeatable for Credit No

PS 416 - Community Power and Grass Roots Politics

Instructor: Benjamin Marquez (T 1:20-3:15pm)

Syllabus: PS 416

3 Credits

Introduces students involved in volunteer or community activism in the Madison area to the literature on political power and community organizing. Conduct field research and write an analysis of activities.
Requisites
Sophomore standing 
Subfield Distribution American Government
Course Designation Breadth – Social Science
Level – Intermediate
L&S Credit – Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S
Repeatable for Credit No

PS 461 - Interdisciplinary Seminar in Political Economy, Philosophy, and Politics

Instructor: Michelle Schwarze (TR 1:00-2:15pm)

Syllabus: PS 461

3 Credits

An interdisciplinary seminar focusing on current policy debates designed to incorporate concepts and approaches from philosophy, political science, and economics.
Requisites
Consent of instructor
Subfield Distribution
Course Designation Breadth- Humanities

Level- Advanced

L&S Credit- Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S

Repeatable for Credit No

PS 463 - Deception and Politics

Instructor: (MW 4:00-5:15pm)

Syllabus: PS 463

4 Credits

This course deals with deception and truth telling as matters of fundamental political concern. Writers ranging from Plato to John Rawls have grappled with the problem of deception and truth-telling in politics. Flattery, hypocrisy, lying as a matter of state, lying as a matter of policy: philosophical explorations of these and related phenomena are at the center of this course.
Requisites
Sophomore standing
Subfield Distribution Political Theory
Course Designation Breadth- Humanities or Social Sciences

Level- Intermediate

L&S Credit- Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S

Repeatable for Credit No

PS 511 - Campaign Finance

Instructor: (MW 2:30-3:45pm)

Syllabus: PS 511

4 Credits

Examination of campaign finance, including: the philosophical rationale behind campaign finance regulations, the history of regulatory frameworks, the influence of campaign contributions on decision making, campaign finance laws in other countries, and reform proposals. Not open to students with credit for POLI SCI 466 prior to fall 2017

Requisites
Sophomore standing and (POLI SCI 104, 184, or POLI SCI/LEGAL ST 217)
Subfield Distribution American Government
Course Designation Breadth – Social Science
Level – Advanced
L&S Credit – Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S
Repeatable for Credit No

PS 519 - African American Political Theory

Instructor: Keisha Lindsay (T 1:20-3:15pm)

Syllabus: PS 519

3 Credits

Explores a range of theories that African Americans have drawn upon to cope with and ameliorate their political circumstances in the United States within the specific parameters of political theory.

Requisites
Sophomore standing and (POLI SCI 160 or AFROAMER 151) or (POLI SCI 209 taken prior to fall 2017) or graduate/professional standing 
Subfield Distribution Political Theory
Course Designation Breadth – Social Science
Level – Intermediate
L&S Credit – Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S
Grad 50% – Counts toward 50% graduate coursework requirement
Repeatable for Credit No

PS 601 - Proseminar: Topics in Political Science (Policy Analysis)

Instructor: Dave Weimer (M 1:20-3:15pm)

Syllabus: PS 601

3 Credits

This course introduces the conceptual foundations and craft of policy analysis. The conceptual topics include a review of market and government failures as rationales for public policy, generic policy alternatives for addressing public policy problems, and professional ethics for policy analysts. Students will build craft skills in semester-long projects to prepare policy analyses on randomly assigned topics. They will frame their assigned issues as policy problems, develop alternatives for addressing the problems, identify relevant policy goals, systematically compare the alternatives in terms of the goals, and consider tradeoffs among goals to make recommendations. Writing assignments will help students work toward preparing professional-level reports. Student assessment will be in terms of a midterm examination, writing assignments, and pop briefings related to projects.
Requisites
Consent of instructor
Subfield Distribution Political Theory
Course Designation Breadth-  Social Sciences

Level- Advanced

L&S Credit- Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S

Repeatable for Credit No

PS 683 — Senior Honors Thesis Seminar

Instructor: Amy Gangl (T 1:20-3:15pm)

Syllabus: PS 601

3 Credits

A class for honors students writing their senior honors thesis within a seminar format. Focus is on conceptualization, research design, writing of the thesis, and relevant issues of political science. Only senior majors writing honor thesis.

Requisites

Junior standing and declared in an Honors program

Subfield Distribution Thesis
Course Designation Level – Advanced
L&S Credit – Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S
Honors – Honors Only Courses (H)
Repeatable for Credit No

Spring 2024 Courses

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PS 104 - Introduction to American Politics and Government

Instructor:  (MW 4:00-5:15pm)

Syllabus: PS 104

4 Credits

Basic institutions and processes of American government. The role of constitutional structures, parties, interest groups and elections in the system; policy formation and policy content.

Requisites
Not open to students who have taken POLI SCI 184 or POLI SCI 404
Subfield Distribution American Government
Course Designation Breadth- Social Science

Level- Elementary

L&S Credit- Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S

Repeatable for Credit No

PS 120 - Introduction to Comparative Politics

Instructor: Nils Ringe (TR 2:30-3:45pm)

Syllabus: PS 120

4 Credits

Introduction to Comparative Politics, one of the four sub-fields in Political Science, which involves the comparative analysis of political institutions, processes, and outcomes at the national level. Examines how to usefully compare politics in a variety of countries and makes comparisons explicit and systematic in order to determine how governments work, how power is organized and contested at the national level, and how regular people can participate and pursue their interests in different political settings. Includes key concepts, theories, methods, issues, and language.
Requisites
Not open to students with credit for POLI SCI 182 (or POLI SCI 186 prior to Fall 2017)
Subfield Distribution Comparative Politics
Course Designation Breadth- Social Science

Level- Elementary

L&S Credit- Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S

Repeatable for Credit No

PS 140 - Introduction to International Relations

Instructor: Andrew Kydd (MW 2:30-3:45pm)

Syllabus: PS 140

4 Credits

Covers the major issues in international relations since the end of World War II including: the causes of war; civil wars and ethnic conflict; economic development; international trade; exchange rates and international monetary relations; international capital flows and financial crises; foreign direct investment; globalization and the environment; the UN, the IMF, World Bank, WTO, and other international organizations; and international law and human rights. The focus is on states’ relations with each other and the factors determining the nature and outcomes of these international interactions. The course seeks to develop analytical tools for thinking about important questions in world politics regardless of the countries or issues involved, to examine international affairs in a systematic way. Students who have taken POLI SCI 103 prior to Fall 2017 may not enroll in this course.
Requisites
None
Subfield Distribution International Relations
Course Designation Breadth- Social Science

Level- Elementary

L&S Credit- Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S

Repeatable for Credit No

PS 160 - Introduction to Political Theory

Instructor: Michelle Schwarze (TR 9:30-10:45am)

Syllabus: PS 160

4 Credits

Exploration of core problems of political life, such as the nature and limits of obligation, the concept of justice and its political implications, and the relationship between equality and liberty, through a selection of ancient and modern sources. Not open to students with credit for POLI SCI 209 prior to fall 2017
Requisites
None
Subfield Distribution Political Theory
Course Designation Breadth- Humanities

Level- Elementary

L&S Credit- Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S

Repeatable for Credit No

PS 170 - Research Methods in Political Science

Instructor: Thomas Worth (TR 3:30-4:20pm)

Syllabus: PS 170

4 Credits

Introduction to political science as a discipline that focuses on the development of research questions, research designs, and the quantitative and qualitative tools commonly used to implement research designs.
Requisites
None
Subfield Distribution
Course Designation Breadth- Social Sciences

Level- Elementary

L&S Credit- Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S

Repeatable for Credit No

PS 201 - Special Topics in PS (Hearing Public Opinion)

Instructor: Katherine Cramer (T 1:20-3:15pm)

Syllabus: PS 201

3 Credits

An experimental topics course that introduces students to compelling recent events and to the current research of political scientists. 

Requisites
None
Subfield Distribution
Course Designation Breadth- Social Sciences / Humanities

Level- Elementary

L&S Credit- Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S

Repeatable for Credit This course can be repeated by students, but not with the same content.

PS 201 - Special Topics in PS (Ecological Restoration as Civic Engagement)

Instructor: John Zumbrunnen (W 2:20-3:15pm)

Syllabus: PS 201

3 Credits

An experimental topics course that introduces students to compelling recent events and to the current research of political scientists. 

Requisites
None
Subfield Distribution
Course Designation Breadth- Social Sciences / Humanities

Level- Elementary

L&S Credit- Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S

Repeatable for Credit This course can be repeated by students, but not with the same content.

PS 254 - Eastern Europe: An Interdisciplinary Survey

Instructor: David Danaher (TR 2:30-3:45pm)

Syllabus: PS 253

4 Credits

Comprehensive interdisciplinary survey of East European culture, society, politics, and literature from its beginnings to the present day.
Requisites
None
Subfield Distribution
Course Designation Breadth- Social Sciences / Humanities

Level- Elementary

L&S Credit- Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S

Repeatable for Credit No

 

PS 255 - Introduction to East Asian Civilizations

Instructor: Viren Murthy (TR 2:30-3:45pm)

Syllabus: PS 255

4 Credits

Multidisciplinary and historical perspectives on the East Asian civilizations of China, Japan, Korea, Tibet and Mongolia from prehistory to the present, including developments in philosophy, economy, governance, social structure, kinship, geography, etc.
Requisites
None
Subfield Distribution Comparative Politics
Course Designation Breadth- Social Sciences / Humanities

Level- Elementary

L&S Credit- Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S

Repeatable for Credit No

PS 260 - Latin America: An Introduction

Instructor:  (TR 9:30-10:45am)

Syllabus: PS 260

4 Credits

Latin American culture and society from an interdisciplinary perspective; historical developments from pre-Columbian times to the present; political movements; economic problems; social change; ecology in tropical Latin America; legal systems; literature and the arts; cultural contrasts involving the US and Latin America; land reform; labor movements; capitalism, socialism, imperialism; mass media.
Requisites
None
Subfield Distribution Comparative Politics
Course Designation Breadth- Social Sciences

Level- Elementary

L&S Credit- Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S

Repeatable for Credit No

PS 272 - Introduction to Public Policy

Instructor: Joel Clark (MW 2:30-3:45pm) or (TR 2:30-3:45pm)

Syllabus: PS 272

3 Credits

Major issues of public policy in such fields as economic management, welfare, education, health, energy and the environment. How public problems develop, approaches to policy-making, why programs succeed and fail. Not open to students with credit for POLI SCI 219 prior to fall 2017
Requisites
Sophomore standing
Subfield Distribution American Government
Course Designation Breadth- Social Sciences

Level- Intermediate

L&S Credit- Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S

Repeatable for Credit No

PS 277 - Africa: An Introductory Survey

Instructor:Jacqueline-Bethel (TR 9:30-10:45)

Syllabus: PS 277

4 Credits

African society and culture, polity and economy in multidisciplinary perspectives from prehistory and ancient kingdoms through the colonial period to contemporary developments, including modern nationalism, economic development and changing social structure.
Requisites
None
Subfield Distribution Comparative Politics
Course Designation Breadth- Social Sciences / Humanities

Level- Intermediate

L&S Credit- Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S

Repeatable for Credit No

PS 302 - Mexican-American Politics

Instructor: Benjamin Marquez (TR 1:00-2:15pm)

Syllabus: PS 302

3 Credits

This class examines the major problems and issues in Mexican-American politics since World War II. An emphasis will be placed on the ways in which race, class and culture have structured politics for the Mexican origin people. Not open to students with credit for POLI SCI 464 prior to fall 2017
Requisites
Sophomore standing
Subfield Distribution American Government
Course Designation Breadth- Social Sciences

Level- Intermediate

L&S Credit- Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S

Repeatable for Credit No

PS 314 - Criminal Law and Justice

Instructor: Tatiana Paula da C (MW 4:00-5:15pm)

Syllabus: PS 314

3 Credits

Substantive and procedural aspects of criminal law, including the purposes of criminal justice, specific crimes, criminal responsibility and punishment, legal concepts of proof, and 4th, 5th, and 6th Amendment issues. The case approach is used. Not open to students with credit for POLI SCI 452 prior to fall 2017.

Requisites
Sophomore standing and a course in POLI SCI or SOC
Subfield Distribution American Government
Course Designation Breadth – Social Science
Level – Intermediate
L&S Credit – Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S
Repeatable for Credit No

PS 315 - Legislative Internship

Instructor: Amy Gangl (Online)

Syllabus: PS 415

3 Credits

Practical experience in a legislative office. Policy research. Readings in legislative process.

PS 316 - Careers in Political Science

Instructor: Amy Gangl (W 1:20-3:15pm)

Syllabus: PS 316

1 Credits

Facilitates transitions from undergraduate academic learning related to Political Science to meaningful and rewarding professional opportunities including jobs, paid internships, graduate study, and post-graduate fellowships. Building on core coursework in Political Science and related disciplines, addresses how to utilize existing academic learning and completed readings and assignments, extra-curricular activities, student research, for-pay work, internships, and interaction with alumni and other personal networks to further develop career options. Also provides practical ways to explore and pursue a wide range of career pathways related to Political Science. Develop essential professional development materials and self-promotional skills.
Requisites
Sophomore standing
Subfield Distribution
Course Designation Breadth-

Level- Intermediate

L&S Credit- Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S

Repeatable for Credit No

PS 320 - Governments and Politics of the Middle East and North Africa

Instructor: Steven Brooke (TR 9:30-10:45am)

Syllabus: PS 320

4 Credits

An introduction to the most pertinent themes to the study of politics and governance in the Middle East. Main topics to be covered: political economy of the region; link between Islam, culture and democracy; the politics of authoritarianism; and political Islam.

PS 339 - Non-Democracies

Instructor: Steven Brooke (TR 8:00-9:15am)

Syllabus: PS 339

3 Credits

Requisites
Sophomore standing, POLI SCI 104 or 140
Subfield Distribution
Course Designation Breadth – Social Science
Level – Intermediate
L&S Credit – Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S
Repeatable for Credit No

PS 340 - The European Union: Politics and Political Economy

Instructor: Nils Ringe (TR 4:00-5:15pm)

Syllabus: PS 340

4 Credits

Introduction to the history and theory of European integration. Topics include the workings of EU institutions and law, the effect of the EU on national politics and economy, economic politics and policy-making in the EU, the EU as an actor in the world economy. Students who have taken POLI SCI 338 prior to Fall 2017 may not enroll in this course.
Requisites
POLI SCI 120, 140, 182, or INTL ST 101 (or POLI SCI 103, 106, or 186 taken prior to fall 2017) or graduate standing.
Subfield Distribution International Relations
Course Designation Breadth- Social Sciences

Level- Intermediate

L&S Credit- Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S

Repeatable for Credit No

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PS 343 - Theories of International Security

Instructor: Scott Mobley (TR 4:00-5:15pm)

Syllabus: PS 343

4 Credits

Role of alliances in contemporary and historical international political systems. Purpose of alliance formation; reasons for their dissolution; relationship of alliance activity with international war and with political integration. Role of alliances in future international systems. Not open to students with credit for POLI SCI 367 prior to fall 2017
Requisites
Sophomore standing and (POLI SCI 140 or INTL ST 101) or (POLI SCI 103 taken prior to Fall 2017)
Subfield Distribution International Relations
Course Designation Breadth- Social Science

Level- Intermediate

L&S Credit- Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S

Repeatable for Credit No

PS 344 - The Russian War On Ukraine: Causes and Consequences

Instructor: Yoshiko Herrera (MW 1:20-2:10pm)

Syllabus: PS 344

3 Credits

Examines causes and consequences of the Russian invasion and war on Ukraine. Analyzes the war using concepts in comparative politics (e.g., regime type, national identity, and domestic politics in Ukraine and Russia) and international relations (e.g., international security, institutions and norms, sanctions and trade, migration and human rights).

Requisites
Sophomore standing
Subfield Distribution Comparative Politics
Course Designation Breadth- Social SciencesLevel- Intermediate

L&S Credit- Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S

Repeatable for Credit No

PS 348 - Analysis of International Relations

Instructor: Lisa Martin (MW 11:00-11:50am)

Syllabus: PS 348

3 Credits

Focuses on how to analyze problems in international politics by the use of game theory. Examples include governments making choices about the size of their military forces, barriers to trade, or international agreements on environmental issues. Analysts study strategic interaction using both informal and mathematical methods. Provides a good introduction to the basics of game theory — a tool useful in many different settings — as well as an introduction to the study of world politics. From the perspective of quantitative reasoning, one of the most important set of lessons center on the logic of strategic interaction and the notion of equilibrium. Along with basic game theory students will also be introduced to the pragmatic use of mathematical tools including algebra, set theory, functions, and probability theory. Not open to students with credit for POLI SCI 376 prior to fall 2017

Requisites
Satisfied Quantitative Reasoning (QR) A requirement and (POLI SCI 140 or INTL ST 101) or (POLI SCI 103 taken prior to Fall 2017)
Subfield Distribution
Course Designation Breadth- Social SciencesLevel- Intermediate

L&S Credit- Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S

Repeatable for Credit No

PS 350 - International Political Economy

Instructor: Allison Myren (TR 4:00-5:15pm)

Syllabus: PS 350

4 Credits

Analyzes the interaction of politics and economics in the international arena, both historically and in the contemporary era of globalization. Focuses on international trade, monetary, and financial relations in both developed and developing economies. Not open to students with credit for POLI SCI 371 prior to fall 2017
Requisites
Sophomore standing and (POLI SCI 140 or INTL ST 101) or (POLI SCI 103 taken prior to fall 2017) or graduate standing
Subfield Distribution International Relations
Course Designation Breadth- Social Sciences

Level- Intermediate

L&S Credit- Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S

Repeatable for Credit No

PS 354 - International Institutions and World Order

Instructor: Lisa Martin (TR 11:00-11:50am)

Syllabus: PS 354

3 Credits

The study of international cooperation and the analysis of regional, functional, and universal regimes and institutions. Not open to students with credit for POLI SCI 337 prior to fall 2017
Requisites
Sophomore standing and (POLI SCI 140 or INTL ST 101) or (POLI SCI 103 taken prior to fall 2017) or graduate standing
Subfield Distribution International Relations
Course Designation Breadth- Social Sciences

Level- Intermediate

L&S Credit- Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S

Repeatable for Credit No

PS 356 - Principles of International Law

Instructor: Joorahm Kim (TR 2:30-3:45pm)

Syllabus: PS 356

3 Credits

A survey course that focuses on interactions among the primary entities in the international system; namely, states, inter- governmental and non-governmental organizations, and other international actors governed by international law. The study of international relations and international law is absolutely critical to understanding contemporary politics, both domestic and foreign. This course addresses both structural and substantive issues related to international law. In other words, it should provide basic tools for understanding the way in which international law works, as well as introduce substantive issues of interest to students of world politics. The course will place special emphasis on the role of international organizations in the international legal system, and special attention will be paid to the European Union as an international actor within this system of law. Not open to students with credit for POLI SCI 316 prior to fall 2017
Requisites
Sophomore standing
Subfield Distribution International Relations
Course Designation Breadth- Social Science

Level- Intermediate

L&S Credit- Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S

Repeatable for Credit No

PS 362 - Athenian Democracy

Instructor: Claire Taylor (MWF 9:55-10:45am)

Syllabus: PS 362

3 Credits

Explores key issues in the ideology and practice of Athenian democracy. Examines democratic values, institutions, rhetoric, and sociology in order to provide the basic tools to understand democracy in its ancient context. Engages with a variety of source material (literary, archaeological, epigraphic) in order to develop multiple skills of interpretation. Some questions examined include: What are the key features of Athenian democracy, how did it change over time, and how did it differ from modern democracy? How did the Athenians justify and critique this political system? How did they reconcile citizen egalitarianism with social inequalities of wealth, gender, and status? To what extent were women, foreigners, slaves, or the poor included or excluded from politics? Was Athenian democracy a robust political system or a system in crisis?
Requisites
Sophomore standing
Subfield Distribution International Relations
Course Designation Breadth- Social Science

Level- Intermediate

L&S Credit- Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S

Repeatable for Credit No

PS 363 - Literature and Politics

Instructor: Aleisha Lachette (TR 11:00am-12:15pm)

Syllabus: PS 363

3 Credits

Interactions between literature and politics, and the role of literature more generally in the functioning of the political systems. Not open to students with credit for POLI SCI 570 prior to fall 2017
Requisites
Sophomore standing
Subfield Distribution International Relations
Course Designation Breadth- Social Science

Level- Intermediate

L&S Credit- Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S

Repeatable for Credit No

PS 373 - Introduction to Survey Research

Instructor: Eleanor Powell (MW 2:25-3:15pm)

Syllabus: PS 373

3 Credits

Theory and practice of survey research; planning, sampling, questionnaire construction, interviewing, content analysis, machine tabulation, analysis of data; two hours lecture; two hours lab or field work. Not open to students with credit for POLI SCI 544 prior to fall 2017
Requisites
Sophomore standing
Subfield Distribution Research Methods
Course Designation Breadth- Social Science

Level- Intermediate

L&S Credit- Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S

Repeatable for Credit No

PS 377 - Nuclear Weapons and World Politics

Instructor: Mikhail Troitskiy (TR 1:00-2:15pm)

Syllabus: PS 377

3 Credits

Covers the origins of nuclear weapons, the reasons states seek them, the strategies developed for their use, the consequences of their development, and efforts to control and reverse their spread.

Requisites
Sophomore standing and (POLI SCI 140 or INTL ST 101) or (POLI SCI 103 taken prior to fall 2017) or graduate standing
Subfield Distribution International Relations
Course Designation Breadth- Social SciencesLevel- Intermediate

L&S Credit- Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S

Repeatable for Credit No

PS 401 - Selected Topics in Political Science (The Marshall Court and the Constitution)

Instructor: Ryan Owens (W 3:30-5:25pm)

Syllabus: PS 401

3 Credits

A topics course for the exploration of current issues in Political Science.
Requisites
Sophomore standing
Subfield Distribution American Government
Course Designation Breadth- Social Science

Level- Intermediate

L&S Credit- Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S

Repeatable for Credit No

PS 401 - Selected Topics in Political Science (Legal Writing, from Counselor to Advocate)

Instructor: Dustin Brown (TR 9:30-10:45am)

Syllabus: PS 401

3 Credits

A topics course for the exploration of current issues in Political Science.

Requisites
Sophomore standing
Subfield Distribution
Course Designation Breadth- Social SciencesLevel- Intermediate

L&S Credit- Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S

Repeatable for Credit No

PS 401 - Selected Topics in Political Science (Election Administration)

Instructor: Kenneth Mayer (R 1:20-3:15pm)

Syllabus: PS 401

3 Credits

A topics course for the exploration of current issues in Political Science.
Requisites
Sophomore standing
Subfield Distribution
Course Designation Breadth- Social SciencesLevel- Intermediate

L&S Credit- Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S

Repeatable for Credit No

PS 405 - State Government and Public Polciy

Instructor: Joel Clark (TR 11:00am-12:15pm)

Syllabus: PS 405

3 Credits

The structure of state government and the politics of public policy-making in the fifty states.

Requisites
Sophomore standing
Subfield Distribution American Government
Course Designation Breadth- Social Sciences

Level- Intermediate

L&S Credit- Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S

Repeatable for Credit No

PS 408 - The American Presidency

Instructor: Kenneth Mayer (TR 11:00am-12:15pm)

Syllabus: PS 408

4 Credits

The President as chief administrative leader, political leader, foreign policy initiator, commander-in-chief, and head of state.
Requisites
Sophomore standing and (POLI SCI 104 or 184)
Subfield Distribution American Government
Course Designation Breadth- Social Science

Level- Intermediate

L&S Credit- Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S

Repeatable for Credit No

PS 435 - Politics of Gender and Women's Rights in the Middle East

Instructor: Marwa Shalaby (W 3:30-5:25pm) or (R 3:30-5:25pm)

Syllabus: PS 435

3 Credits

Explores the intertwined relationship between gender and politics in contemporary Middle East and North Africa. Situates the region’s historical, socio-political, and cultural context that have particularly contributed to shaping the current discourse on gender in the Arab World. Explores – both theoretically and empirically – the role of Arab women in influencing the political processes across the Middle East. Examines real-world examples of Middle Eastern women from different parts of the region who have succeeded to challenge the status quo and push for genuine change.

Requisites
Sophomore standing 
Subfield Distribution Comparative Politics
Course Designation Breadth – Social Science
Level – Intermediate
L&S Credit – Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S
Grad 50% – Counts toward 50% graduate coursework requirement
Repeatable for Credit No

PS 460 - Topics in Political Philosophy (Conservative Political Thought)

Instructor:  Richard Avramenk (M 2:25-5:25pm)

Syllabus: PS 460

3 Credits

Investigation at an advanced level of selected problems in political philosophy.
Requisites
Sophomore standing and (POLI SCI 160 or ILS 205) or (POLI SCI 209 taken prior to fall 2017) or graduate standing
Subfield Distribution Political Theory
Course Designation Breadth- Humanities

Level- Intermediate

L&S Credit- Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S

Repeatable for Credit No

PS 461 - Interdisciplinary Seminar in Political Economy, Philosophy & Politics

Instructor: Timothy Tennyson (TR 9:30-10:45am)

Syllabus: PS 461

3 Credits

An interdisciplinary seminar focusing on current policy debates designed to incorporate concepts and approaches from philosophy, political science, and economics.
Requisites
Consent of instructor
Subfield Distribution
Course Designation Breadth- Humanities

Level- Intermediate

L&S Credit- Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S

Repeatable for Credit No

PS 463 - Deception and Politics

Instructor: Daniel Kapust (TR 1:00-2:15pm)

Syllabus: PS 463

4 Credits

This course deals with deception and truth telling as matters of fundamental political concern. Writers ranging from Plato to John Rawls have grappled with the problem of deception and truth-telling in politics. Flattery, hypocrisy, lying as a matter of state, lying as a matter of policy: philosophical explorations of these and related phenomena are at the center of this course.
Requisites
Sophomore standing
Subfield Distribution Political Theory
Course Designation Breadth- Humanities or Social Sciences

Level- Intermediate

L&S Credit- Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S

Repeatable for Credit No

PS 470 - The First Amendment

Instructor: Craig Fischer (MW 5:00-6:15pm)

Syllabus: PS 470

3 Credits

An examination of the basic principles, purposes, and assumptions of First Amendment cases and literature, with attention to both historical and contemporary controversies.
Requisites
Sophomore standing and (POLI SCI 104, 184, or POLI SCI/LEGAL ST 217)
Subfield Distribution American Government
Course Designation Breadth- Social Sciences

Level- Intermediate

L&S Credit- Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S

Repeatable for Credit No

 

PS 481 - Honors Seminar on Race and Politics in the United States

Instructor: Benjamin Marquez (W 1:20-3:15pm)

Syllabus: PS 481

3 Credits

This course examines the sources and policy implications of racial division in American politics by analyzing a range of issues, such as affirmative action in the workplace and in higher education, the use of black majority districts as a means of enhancing representation of minority interests in Congress, differences in public opinion between whites and blacks, and issues concerning multi-racial and ethnic tensions. We will examine the historical background of race relations and the current policy debates, with a focus on trying to find common-ground solutions. The goal of this seminar is to stimulate critical thinking on this important issue, causing students to think about race and politics in new ways.
Requisites
Junior standing and declared in an Honors program
Subfield Distribution American Government
Course Designation Breadth- Social Sciences

Level- Advanced

L&S Credit- Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S

Repeatable for Credit No

PS 515 - Public Opinion

Instructor: Kathy Cramer (MW 4:00-5:15pm)

Syllabus: PS 515

3 Credits

Formation of opinions within and among the political publics; their role in the development and practice of governmental policy. Not open to students with credit for POLI SCI 473 prior to fall 2017
Requisites
Sophomore standing
Subfield Distribution American Government
Course Designation Breadth- Social Sciences

Level- Advanced

L&S Credit- Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S

Repeatable for Credit No

PS 529 - Arab-Israeli Conflict

Instructor: Nadav Shelef (W 1:20-3:15pm)

Syllabus: PS 529

3 Credits

Examines the political, social, and economic aspects of the evolution of the Arab-Israeli conflict over time, and the theoretical and policy issues it raises. Not open to students with credit for POLI SCI 631 prior to fall 2017

Requisites
Sophomore standing and (POLI SCI 120, 140, 182 or INTL ST 101) or (POLI SCI 103, 106, or 186 taken prior to fall 2017) or graduate standing
Subfield Distribution Comparative Politics
Course Designation Breadth – Social Science
Level – Advanced
L&S Credit – Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S
Grad 50% – Counts toward 50% graduate coursework requirement
Repeatable for Credit No

PS 601 - Proseminar: Topics in Political Science (The Supreme Court's 2023 Term)

Instructor: Ryan Owens (M 1:20-3:15pm)

Syllabus: PS 601

3 Credits

Intensive study and research in selected problems within the constituent fields of political science.
Requisites
Consent of instructor
Subfield Distribution American Government
Course Designation Breadth- Humanities & Social Sciences

Level- Advanced

L&S Credit- Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S

Repeatable for Credit Yes

PS 601 - Proseminar: Topics in Political Science (Election Reform in America)

Instructor: Barry Burden (M 3:30-5:25pm)

Syllabus: PS 601

3 Credits

Intensive study and research in selected problems within the constituent fields of political science.
Requisites
Consent of instructor
Subfield Distribution American Government
Course Designation Breadth- Humanities & Social Sciences

Level- Advanced

L&S Credit- Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S

Repeatable for Credit Yes

 

PS 684 - Senior Honors Thesis Seminar

Instructor: Amy Gangl (T 1:20-3:15pm)

Syllabus: PS 684

3 Credits

A class for honors students writing their senior honors thesis within a seminar format. Focus is on conceptualization, research design, writing of the thesis, and relevant issues of political science. Only senior majors writing honor thesis.

Requisites

Junior standing and declared in an Honors program

Subfield Distribution Thesis
Course Designation Level – Advanced
L&S Credit – Counts as Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S
Honors – Honors Only Courses (H)
Repeatable for Credit No